Charming Window Pillows





Hi!  I'm Angela from My Three Sons and I was a mechanical engineer in my life before kids.  Really an engineer to the core, I'm all about optimized processes and well-utilized materials.

I tried to figure out the best way to make the elusive cathedral window block.  So I'll share some things I found for getting nice points and neat windows.  And they are a perfect showcase for your favorite charm pack.

We're going to make two pillows here - most efficient use of materials and all.  Besides, once you get going on these fun windows, you'll want to make a ton!  I especially hope you give them a try if cathedral windows are new to you.



1 Just Wing It Charm Pack
1 3/4 Yards Bella Solid Snow
4 Just Wing It Fat Quarters

Washable glue stick

2 Square pillow forms - 20"x20"
2 18-20" zippers (optional)
Pink and Blue Matching thread (optional)





Step One: In which you fold fabric and steam it into submission

First, from the white yardage cut 5 strips the entire width of the fabric and each 10.5" wide.


Subcut each of those 5 strips into 10.5" squares so that you end up with a total of 20 pieces.  Since we'll be folding our raw edges in, you don't have to worry about these squares being perfect.

But you do need to make a perfect 9" square out of poster board.  Use an old rotary blade and a square ruler to get straight edges and nice corners.

Find a washable glue stick - or go out and grab a Sewline glue pen.  I love mine.  It goes on blue so you can see where it is, then dries clear.


Center the poster board on a fabric square, then swipe the glue across two corners.  You want the glue to stick to fabric and not poster board when you make the fold.


Fold that edge over the poster board and hot steam iron it.  The glue keeps you from steaming your fingertips to a crisp!


Repeat the glue on each corner as all four edges are pressed.  Iron and steam well!  The better your square here, the better your end result. 


I had learned a couple of different things here.  DO NOT skip these first steps all together and make 9" fabric squares to start off.  Raw points will show in the end and your hard work will be a big, fraying mess.  Second, folding both edges square helped me get the best finish and the little raw bit at the edge right now is completely covered by the time we get to the last step.


Pull out the poster board.  Then fold your square in half both directions, pressing a crease along each center line.



Open up your square with the raw edges pointing up.  Pick a corner and fold it into the center.

What you want to really line up is not the middle, but the outer edges.  I have circles at the points you want to watch.


More steam.  Press all four of those corners in.

See how all the outside corners are sharp?  Choose a sharp corner over an even middle.  It's ok if the center points miss their match a bit.


Fold this square in half again, but just finger press some guides at each edge.


Last folds!  Steam press each point into the center, but this time you really want the points to meet neatly in the middle. 


After all four points are folded into the middle, you may end up with a square like this with a misbehaving corner.  For it's trouble we'll just shove it to an outside edge later. 


Grab your ipod and load it with some episodes of WNYC's Radiolab, fill the water chamber of your steam iron, and crank out all 20 of your folded fabric squares.  We'll only use 18, but you'll be on a roll and the other two can become coasters or a pin cushion.


Step Two:  In which we get to use our sewing machine

For each pillow we'll join up 9 of our blocks in to a 3x3 square.  Lay them out and arrange any troublesome corners to an outside edge.  The seam allowance will take care of them later.


To join two together, sit them next to each other and pull up the touching triangle flaps.  Pin these together. 


We want to sew right along that crease.  AND both creases should be matched perfectly.  To make sure I have things lined up, I put one pin in the crease....


.....flip it over and see that the pin actually runs along the crease on the back side as well.  If the pin isn't in the fold, adjust your pieces and try again.


Once you're all set, sew along the crease - back stitching at each end.   Join all the blocks in rows of three.


Grab two rows of three and place them back to back.  Pin the same as above to match all the creases.


Make sure you back stitch at the start and end of every triangle.  You don't want the pillow falling apart when the kids flop on it.


When your blocks of nine are done, give one last press.   Hurray!  Now we get to do the fun part.


Step Three:  In which you create a colorful masterpiece

First we'll work on the pillow I call "Railroad Berry Patch"  The colors remind me of nature walks with my Grandpa in Michigan.  We would walk along the railroad tracks where tons of red and black raspberries grew.  Yum!


Choose 9 charm squares for the oval petals, and at least 3 contrasting charm squares for the windows.


Grab one of the white windows, and measure your individual squares.



Trim all nine of the charms you chose for the ovals down to that size.


Open up each square and place a charm inside.  Make sure it lays flat.  You want it to completely fill the space without getting turned in the fold.


With the triangle flaps open, sew all the charm squares down.  I used a matching thread and zipper foot because there's a lot of bulk on the sides.


Close all the triangle flaps so that we can force the fabric to our will again.  With white thread in the center of each, take just two or three machine stitches into all the points.  This anchor helps keep your points centered and even, and won't show in the end.


Next, grab your three or more charms set aside for the windows and cut them into fourths.  A 2.5" square is just perfect for the windows.


You only need 12 pieces to fill all the windows, but I cut a few more to give myself some options.


Pick a spot to start and pin the square into the window, with the pin running along side of your first edge.  This keeps the little fabric bit square and in just the right spot.

Fold the center of the window over your fabric - it's about a 1/4" in the middle.  It tapers perfectly to the tacked ends all on it's own.  Keep holding and scoot everything under your needle.


Start at the very top, with your foot pointing along the curve.  Backstitch!


Just a little holding to keep things nicely curved, follow the edge closely.  At this size, it seemed like that curve was just perfect.  I didn't feel I had to battle the machine to keep things neatly lined up.


Back stitch again at the very end.  Move your pin to the next edge....repeat.....


Quickly, one window done!  I love sewing these edges.  It's so fun to see the fabrics revealed underneath as you go along.


See how nicely the points line up with that small tack in the middle.  Without the tack, my ends were all wiggly.


Once all your windows are done, be sure to open the petals along the outside triangles as well.

Next we'll frame up the windows from about 13.5" square to pillow size.

Square up the edge of your white yardage and cut four strips the width of the fabric: two at 2" and two at 2.5"



From one of your fat quarters, cut four 1" strips from the longer 21" side, even though you don't need the strips that long. This is important so that the remaining fabric is the right width for making the pillow back. 


Attach first the 2" white strips to all four sides of your windows.  After they are all on and ironed open, neatly top stitch about 1/8" from the edge.  Since the windows are so thick and heavy, the sides can use a little help to lay flat once stuffed.


Add on your 1" FQ strips, then finally the 2.5" white strips.

Square everything up to 20".


Choose 10 charm squares.  We're going to make some binding.


Sew them all end to end.


Press open your seams then slice the strip down the middle so you have two long pieces 2.5" wide.


Join those two strips up.  Now press in half for your pretty roll of binding.


Make a 20" square back for your pillow with a second fat quarter and about 6.5" of the fat quarter you used as the front accent.  I like zippers in my pillows, you can do your favorite back.

Whatever you choose just place it face down, put your windows on top face up, and stitch them together 1/8" from the edge.


Bind as you like, but I suggest you lay it out quickly before stitching.  With all those seams, you have to start carefully to avoid one landing right on a corner.


Done!


Next up "Lake View" with just the oval petals filled. 



Once again, choose nine charm squares.  I loved all the blues together.


Exactly like the first pillow, trim down those charm squares to fit inside each square and sew them down.

But I have another option for tacking your centers.  I used a short, tight zig zag/satin stitch, going only about an 1/8" into each point.  This method works really well if your triangles have wider flat tips instead of sharp points.


I played around with doing that satin stitch in the blue, but I preferred matching the white.


Cut two more white strips 1.5" the width of the fabric.  Join and top stitch like the first pillow.

Using the third fat quarter you chose, cut four pieces 3" x 21" , attach and square up the finished front to 20"


I used the last fat quarter to make my binding.  Cut four strips 2.5" x 21", join end to end and press in half.


Make this 20" square back with all the remaining fat quarter strips from both pillows.  Baste and bind as above.



Done!




Two 20" square cathedral window pillows.


Angela Nash
{mythreesonsknit.blogspot.com}

108 comments:

schmidt1016 said...

I LOVE THIS! Great directions and photos. Makes me feel as though I might be able to tackle it. Thanks!

Leslie S. in MN
esclante at comcast dot net

Anonymous said...

Wow! that is amazing they always seemed to look so hard but when you break it down I think i'll be able to handle it! Thanks for the great tutorial will definately give them a go. Would you use different size cathedral windows if you wanted to make a european size pillow case?

CJ said...

I've always loved the look of Catherdral Windows but just haven't tackled them yet. I love your step by step with photos and this might be just what I need to take the leap! Thank you.

The One and Only said...

holy crap!! this tutorial really makes me feel like I can totally accomplish this, being a newbie to sewing! Seriously, thanks so much!! kudos to yoU!!

Stacey said...

This is a wonderful tutorial and the pillows are amazing. I love the way the windows put the spotlight on the beautiful fabrics!

Maria said...

Fantastic! Just have to try this... one day!

Kelli said...

This is a really great tutorial on such a "scary" quilt technique!
Thankyou so much!
I can't wait to give one a try!!!

Mia said...

Beautyful, i have made Catherdral Windows in hand sewing, i vill, thanks to you try to sew it with sewing machine.

Sorry, my writhing in English is not so god :-O
Mia

Sue W ♥ said...

only last week I finished off a cushion which I painstakingly hand stitched and vowed never to do another, hate hand stitching, but after seeing your machine stitched versions I might have to make one for myself

Sunnybec said...

I have never made cathedral windows, they always seemed too difficult but your instructions were very easy to follow so may have ago. Thank you.

Joy said...

I LOVE this! I always shyed away from windows believing them to be too difficult. Now having read this I feel empowered to have a go. Thanks so much for such careful instructions and using a smaller project to give us all confidence.

Jenny said...

beautiful angela! thanks for such concise directions!

Linz said...

SO so pretty!! Thank you!!

Kimminita said...

This pattern is called the Flower of Life. Actually pretty interestig stuff. I love drawing them in a mandala, but even though I think your instructions are very clear, i am afraid thi sis a little out of my league. I will favorite it though, because with a little more sewing experience (and time) I think this can be done.

And in case you wish to read about the flower of life: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flower_of_Life

Angela (Cottage Magpie) said...

Oh, this is excellent! I hadn't really considered making cathedral windows before, but these look so neat that I'm really inspired to try it! And great instructions!
Thanks!
~Angela~

Charlotte said...

wonderful, clear instructions and a great set of pillows! Thanks so much :-D

Monika said...

Oh I like this variation. I have just made one ~(by hand) and I like the thought of making another. I will try the machine method for tghis one though. Thanks for the great tute. I am going to search through my stasha and get busy.

Little Miss Shabby said...

This is a wonderful tutorial. =) I have made cathedral windows before and you have explained them beautifully! =)

Jessica at Me Sew Crazy said...

oh my - these are so gorgeous!!! Thank you so much for sharing with is!!!

Elizabeth D. said...

Gorgeous tute, Angela!!!! Awesome job!

Jen of ReannaLily Designs said...

Ok, I totally want to try this!

Jo Turner said...

Oh wow!! How wonderful. When I saw the pictures I almost didn't look at the recipe as it looked too complicated for me. I am so glad I looked! Your tutorial is very clear - great instructions and clear pictures. I might just tackle a one-square coaster this afternoon and see how I get on. Thanks also for showcasing the beautiful fabric - it's definitely on my wish list now!! Thanks for taking the time to share.

susiloci said...

Un trabajo maravilloso!!! ícil.Aunque un poco dif

Sanne said...

this looks so neat and nice and proper, just like spring. It loks like I could do it too!
thanks for encouraging people like me.
You´re doing a good job!Thanks a lot

Sanne from Germany

Miwako said...

I have recently come to know there is such a thing as a cathedral window quits. I love this one. Small enough that I might actually be able to make one! Thank you so much for the recipe.

Suzanne said...

Thank you for a great tutorial with lots of pictures. I've bookmarked this one for future use.

Cathy said...

Wow! These are stunning! I love the designs on this website, but this pillow is just wonderful and I can't wait to make them!!

Chris {frecklemama} said...

GORGEOUS! The tutorial is extremely clear and well-written. Pictures are great! Very well done. I can't wait to try!

angela said...

Thank you everybody!

If you would like to make a European sized case, you could combine all the squares from both pillows into one and make the solid edge just a tad larger. That way you can still use the charm squares for your windows.

Violeta said...

Wow....It´s so cute...but I think it is so dificult.... I can´t do that!!!

Jennifer said...

fabulous tutorial. thank you for showing and explaining best practices for making cathedral windows, instead of just showing how. your tips on what was important to fuss over and what wasn't are very helpful.

Caroline said...

This is amazing! I've always wondered how to do the Cathedral Windows, but it looked so hard I'd never considered that I'd actually be able to do it. With your tutorial I think I can! Thank you!

Cindy said...

How beautiful !! And your directions/photos are excellent.

Thank you for sharing these wonderful pillows with your wonderful technique.

paulette said...

I have always wanted to learn how to make Cathedral windows!! NOW I know how!! Talk about clear, easy to do instructions! THANK YOU SEW MUCH!!
Paulette

JenFink said...

LOVE THIS!! Can't wait to go home and start making this! Thanks for the tut.

Sequana said...

It took quite a while to get to the "fun part." And then that didn't really look like "fun" anyway. *L*

However, I think yours is the best tute I've seen for making sure everything matches and holds. Thx for the trouble.

Silk said...

Wow I love this!!!!!!! Fantastic tuto, i've always wanted do the cathedral windows but i've never tried, but, now i look your tuto and i think i can do it!!!!

PamKittyMorning said...

That's the nicest most detailed tutorial on this method I've seen ! Nice work.

Connie said...

I love these. You make it look easy enough for even me to give it a try. Thanks for the great tutorial.

Lisa said...

Love the cathedral windows, and you explain it so well! I'm not up for a whole quilt, but I can do some lovely pillows like yours. Thank you!

JG said...

These are gorgeous pillows! Thanks for sharing your wonderful tutorial and your hint of using a washable glue stick.
~Judy

Dawn said...

Fabulous!! I always wondered how these were made, and you make them look so easy. With your instructions, I just may be able to tackle them!! Thanks!!

Brooke said...

Nice tutorial, Angela! I can never get my points to match up so I'm definitely using your pressing tips and tacking tips to make my corners flat and lovely. I'm making a full cathedral windows quilt some day and these will certainly come in handy. Thanks for figuring this out and sharing with us!

SerendipitiJoy said...

Thanks for writing such wonderfully clear instructions with tips and all. Your project came out so beautifully.

charlotte said...

Okay, you've convinced me to try it. Thanks for the great tutorial.

happy zombie said...

Beautiful!!! And FANTASTIC photos and tutorial!

Katie B. said...

Very cool! I'll have to give this a try.

Kim and Jim said...

Beautiful!! Reading through the tutorial makes me want to try this project! it reminds me of making those "paper poppers" or "fortune tellers" out of a square of paper as a kid- anyone else out there remember those?

zitakiss said...

szuper,szuper,sssssszzzuuuuupppeeerrrr!!!!!!!!!!!szia zita

LeAnne said...

I've been wanting to try Cathedral Windows, but hadn't found the time yet. Your great tutorial is definitely encouraging. I don't think I could do an entire quilt, but a pillow would be a great place to start.

Thanks!

Bente said...

Thank you so much, what a great tutorial! Beautiful cuisions, I´ll try to sew one some day!
hugs!
Bente

purplecraftyt said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Quilting In The Rain said...

Never heard of this technique but an excited to try something new! I'm going to try to make my mom one for mother's day. Thanks!

Corky said...

Love it and want to try it. However, are you sure you used 'snow' Bella Solid? It looks so white in your pictures and it looks more ivory or off white in the online sources I have. ??

M and M plus 3 said...

These are so stinking CUTE! Great directions. You make me feel like even I can do this! Thanks

Ashley Williams said...

Beautiful! I am wondering how to adjust for a 16 x 16 pillow?

Heather said...

These are so cute. Great instructions. :)

Crystal Hendrix said...

Awesome! I now know how to make them!! Thank you

Vicki said...

Beautiful! Great tutorial, Angela!

angela said...

To make a 16 x 16 pillow, and still be able to use the charm squares, you can just make the solid borders thinner. Or, just change your initial white square from 9" to something like 7" and then you can still have a wider solid on the outside.

angela said...

Moda directly sent me the bella snow, so I'm trusting it was correct. But in general I'm sure both you and I have been tricked by snow and other similar creamy whites.....All on their own they seem creamy, but once they are in with all the other fabrics they look bright white. Many quilters actually prefer to use snow to avoid the glare of a bleached white.

wendy said...

WOW! This is amazing. I love the look of the cathedral windows BUT they have scared me away for fear of messing up and it being tooooo difficult. Your explanation if awesome and I can't wait to try it!!!

Quilting In The Rain said...

i am still mesmerized by this pattern... :-[ )

tarabu said...

I'm worn out just reading the directions! I will be trying this at some point, but I think I might need to start with a single-block mug mat or such!

sue niven said...

I really love this tutorial, thanks! i will definitely give it a go.

Anonymous said...

Learned how to do this BY HAND completely from my great aunt 20 years ago. Love the updated version, especially to make the foundation pieces with the cardboard template to press with. Thanks for the updated tute.

Shirley in Canada said...

I like how you did this!! I do think I will have to try this!! Thank you for such a great Tutorial!

Erika L said...

I have always admired the Cathedral Windows but felt it was too fiddly and too complicated. Your tutorial makes me feel like it is possible and is well set out. Fantastic explanations and photos.

amy smart said...

GORGEOUS, Angela!! I have always admired this design, but felt way too intimidated to make it myself. You give me reason to believe! :) Beautiful photos. Well done!

marni said...

This is absolutely amazing - your directions are so clear and your writing style has convinced me that this couldn't be easier! My one question/problem - i'm already caught up on RadioLab. Can I accomplish this anyway?

Modern Male Homemaker said...

I was afraid to open this tutorial and waited a couple days to do so for fear you would take something I'd been dreading and make it accessible. Sure enough, you did! I love how you've taken the idea and used it for pillows, but I'm thinking if I could just make 16 to 24 of those and do a full sized quilt... one thing at a time, right? Thanks for the great tutorial! Can't wait to give it a go!

Leila said...

Beautiful! Great tutorial!

Robin said...

Wonderful pillows! You've got me all excited to try this technique. Thanks so much for sharing your secrets! :)

VickiT said...

This is my absolute favorite quilt block. Great tutorial. I hope to be brave enough to try this one soon.

SarahB said...

Love, love, love this!!! I will definitely be trying this one!

Cecilia said...

You did an excellent job with your tutorial. I've made Cathedral Window by hand and have always had a hard time getting the points to look really neat. I will have to try your version with the machine. Great job!

Amanda said...

I love these pillows and the fabric. Also, this has got to be one of the best tutorials I have seen. Thank you so much for taking the time to break it down step by step and with pictures. I am definitely going to make these pillows. Thanks!

Josefina said...

Hola, me gustan mucho tus trabajos, te felicito por ellos .Yo tambien soy una aficionada a las manualidades, ganchillo, patchwork, pintura.. es por eso que me gusta todo esto. Saludos Josefina
tijeras y cuchara WordPress.com

Mauby said...

Cannot wait to make up one of these! Fabulous!

Mermaid's Purse said...

It's a few years since I've done any "Cathedral Window" - it's good to see people are still having fun with it. Lovely colours!

Sum Kuller said...

AMAZINGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG...!
Thank You sooooooo much for the tutorial...!
xoxoxox

Josefina said...

Me gustan mucho tus trabajos. Te felicito.
saludos
Josefina
tijeras y cuchara wordpress.com

Anjeanette said...

I'm in Love! This is a really great tutorial. I love how you tacked down the center points to keep them so perfectly together! Thanks for this great tutorial!

Katie Bishop said...

Fantastic tutorial! I just made 4 squares to try my hand at this and while I still need to perfect it, I am no longer afraid! Thank you!

Suzanne said...

I love this, too - I love the cutwork look it has, and yet it is more tidy than actual cutwork - so many possibilities!

Ann Marie said...

I love the two tone pillow!

Ms Sharma said...

Oh My! I always found this very difficult and did not have the guts to try it. But you made it so simple. Now I can understand and follow each step. Hats of to you... I understand what are the advantages of being an engineer...:)

Now I will try some. Beautiful photos, clear instructions and very great tutorial. Thanks a lot for posting this...It will be of great help to people like me...

Ms Sharma
http://summersofindia.blogspot.com/

elizabethdee said...

Thank you so much for your beautifully written tutorial. I just finished a cathedral window pillow and if only I had had the benefit of all your wonderful tips! You have made me want to do more very very soon.

fabriccreations said...

I absolutely love these windows! Grandma taught me how to do these. She made a quilt out of these, only she hand stitched hers. I don't think I'd be able to do this if I hand stitched;) Beautiful!!!!!

patchworkdelights said...

I have loved cathedral windows ever since my mum showed me how to make it when she was doing patchwork. I always promised myself I would make it myself. I have made cathedral windows by hand as opposed to by machine, but your tut is so clear and your choice of colours is stunning that I will now be making machine cathedral windows! Also a lot quicker to get your result! LOVE IT! Fi

Anonymous said...

This is awesome! Thanks for making it look *gulp* deceptively easy! Can't wait to try it-
Quick question - did you try starting with 10" squares at the beginning? I'm lazy and would just get a layer cake to save on cutting. Any particular reason for 10.5"?
Thanks!

angela said...

RE: starting with 10" layer cake squares

That's a cool idea - then your white window part would have a print! By using a 10" square instead of 10.5", you will lose just a quarter inch of your fold-over on each starting edge. With a half inch, you should be fine, but be careful to center your 9" template well. Thinner edges are tricky in that they want to pop back up. Just use Lots of steam and press well!

I would love to see some pictures when you get those made up!

Hexe said...

Wow, das ist ja eine interessante Technik und die Kissen sehen super aus. Vielen Dank für die tolle Anleitung. Vielleicht werd ich es auch einmal ausprobieren.
Liebe Grüße Hexe

Jessica at Me Sew Crazy said...

Had a lot of fun working with this pattern! Turned it into a belt...

http://www.mesewcrazy.com/2011/05/charming-window-pattern-remix.html

Thanks so much for the tutorial and inspiration!

Turtlegurl said...

These are STUNNING! I have Always loved cathedral windows - thanks for making such a comprehensive tutorial...I feel like now I can actually make them!

Colleen said...

I finally finished mine!!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/auburn2001grad/5808773149/

Thank you for the great tutorial. I love cathedral windows but I'm a bit scared of them. :) Your step by step process made it not so scary. There's definitely a knack to them but I think I can get it after a few more small projects. And they sure are pretty. Thanks again!!

Staci K. said...

Thank you for taking the time to create this tut! I love cathedral window quilts but they always seemed very intimidating. This is so well written and the photos are very clear and helpful. I have these pillows on my to do list!

shishie said...

When I was in highschool I had to make one of these for Art class. I mde it by hand and got an A. I wish I had your tutorial around back then,although it has been 30 years since that first pillow, i still love this technique. Thank you for sharing, I love it.

crafterellasisters said...

Wow! What a beautifyl project! Thanks for sharing.

Anne said...

I just finished making two of these and I LOVED your instructions, thank you! I'm also an engineer, so I really appreciated the way it was laid out and what parts to pay attention to and what parts to let go.

I did make one change between the first and second version. For the first, when creating the squares to go inside each fabric origami block, I trimmed as you said. However, that left raw edges and I was worried about that. So for the second, I folded the edges over to make them the right size, ironed, and then sewed them in. I'm much happier with the way it looks, although I admit, it's a bit harder.

Also, how do you get your template to not buckle like mad when you are using it to iron the edges? I even got a piece of mylar template material for the second one and had the same problem. My first set of blocks were super nice and neat, and by the last one everything was off by a bit because of the ongoing buckling issue.

Anyway, thank you so much for one of the best written tutorials I've seen. :) Sorry this comment is so long, but since it's #100, I wanted it to be worth it. ;D

Anne said...

And here's the pillows I made with your tutorial. I made two with the same layout, same fabrics, just a different solid between the two. It's an interesting effect:

http://www.asdesigned.com/blog/?p=274

Allison said...

Thank you, thank you, thank you for the Tutorial! I love how crisp and precise these are!

Donna Baker said...

Great tutorial-always loved this look but had no earthly idea how it was done. your directions mske it look doable. thanks for sharing!! The pilliws are gorgeous

Goegurt said...

I seem to be stuck on one part of the instructions. After I have finished with all of my windows, I am suppose to, Attach first the 2" white strips to all four sides of your windows. After they are all on and ironed open, neatly top stitch about 1/8" from the edge. I'm not exactly sure how to do that. Do I fold it over and sew it on both sides? Do I lay it right side to right side and sew a seam first and then iron flat? I'm stuck, please help me. I love them and must move on with this cool project.

Lady Reverse said...

Very very nice

smee said...

I made one of these for my sister-in-law for Christmas last year, it turned out really well so thank you for the tutorial :)

My only negative comment would be that when I ordered the Bella Snow fabric, it was more an ivory colour than white (although luckily I was doing a deep red for the accents so it wasn't a disaster). Is the white actually called something else?

shannon said...

I know this comment is waaaay after the fact, but I just have to say THANK YOU. I have been searching and searching for a way to get the white border and contrasting background and windowpane effect and this is the first explanation I've found that actually makes sense and goes into detail! Will be trying this for sure!!

Carolyn H said...

very pretty, clear instructions, I made some of these squares about 30 years ago, thought they were too hard, but you make it look easier ...I think I am tempted to make it again, pillows, how nice. Thanks for your directions. I appreciate it. Carolyn H