60-Minute Gift: Bake ‘n’ Fry Dividers


The holiday season is approaching and now is the time to start sewing and making gifts for friends and families. Today I will be sharing a quick project which can be made in under an hour to brighten up your kitchen drawers and protect your non stick cooking surfaces.


1 x Summerville Layer Cake
1 yd Bella solid snow 9900-11
1 yd Flannel
Light weight iron on pellon
Fusible web


Baking Tray Liners ( 30 mins )

  • Measure the baking tray. Record the measurement. For the purpose of this tutorial I will be making a liner to suit a 10″ x 15″ base. If you have have a smaller or larger tray, add 1/2″ to the measured length and width.
  • From the solid cut 12 x 1 1/2″ strips
  • From the print cut 12 x 1 1/2″ strips
  • Alternate the solid and print and sew strips together
  • Finished block is 8 1/2″ x 10″
  • Make 3 blocks
  • Cut each block twice on the diagonal
  • Sew 2 triangles together to make a half square triangle (HST). Repeat with remaining triangles.
  • Square each HST to 5 1/2″
  • Arrange in 2 rows of 3 blocks each
  • Sew together
  • Finished top measures 10 1/2″ x 15 1/2″
  • From the solid cut 1 – 10 1/2″ x 15 1/2″ piece
  • From the iron on pellon cut 1 – 10 1/2″ x 15 1/2″ piece
  • Press the pellon to the wrong side of the solid piece
  • Place the solid and top piece right sides together. Pellon will be on the outside.
  • Sew 1/4″ from edge leaving a 4″ gap at the top for turning.
  • Trim the corners and turn out. Use a stiletto or pointed object to push out seams and corners.
  • Fold under opening 1/4″ and top stitch 1/8″ around edge of liner.
  • Trace the letters ‘BAKE’ (these can be found in the Printer Friendly file at the bottom of this post) onto the dull side of the fusible webbing
  • Cut 1/8″ away from the pencil line and press to back of selected print.
  • Cut on pencil line and peel of paper backing
  • Position and press onto front of liner
  • Using a straight stitch or blanket stitch machine stitch the appliqué.


Hint: These liners are meant to be scrappy in nature. There are unlimited block designs and scrappy settings that could be used as long as the unfinished top is 1/2″ longer and wider than the base of the tray.

Frying Pans ( 30 mins)

  •  Measure the diameter of the pan including the sides.  Record the measurement.
  • Cut strips from the Layer Cake and make a piece measuring 10″ x 48″
  • Using a 60 degree triangle ruler or the 60 degree marking on your ruler, cut 6 triangles from the strip
  • Sew 3 triangles together. Repeat.
  • Join the two rows together.
  • Cut a circle ( using a compass / pencil and string / large plate ) 1″ larger than the diameter, including sides, of your pan. For example, my pan measured 15 1/2″ from side to side. I would cut a circle with diameter of 16 1/2″
N.B The hexagon made from the 6 triangles can accommodate a circle up to 17″ in diameter.
 
  •  From the flannel cut a circle the same size as the top
  • Place the flannel and top piece wrong sides together.
  • Sew 1/4″ from edge using a shorter stitch
  • Using pinking shears, cut around edge 1/8″ away from stitching.
N.B these liners do not require pellon
Two options for appliqué
  • Cut a piece 6″ x 10″ from print
  • Stitch to centre of liner
  • Trace the letters ‘FRY’ ( these can be found in the PDF format for this project ) onto the dull side of the fusible webbing
  • Cut 1/8″ away from the pencil line and press to back of selected print.
  • Cut on pencil line and peel of paper backing
  • Position and press onto 6″ x 10″ piece
  • Using a straight stitch or blanket stitch machine stitch the appliqué.
  • Cut a 5 1/2″ circle from layer cake
  • Stitch to centre of liner
  • Trace the letters ‘FRY’ ( these can be found in the PDF format for this project ) onto the dull side of the fusible webbing
  • Cut 1/8″ away from the pencil line and press to back of selected print.
  • Cut on pencil line and peel of paper backing
  • Position and press onto liner centre
  • Using a straight stitch or blanket stitch machine stitch the appliqué.


Two baking and fry pan liners to dress up your kitchen drawers and protect your non stick surfaces.

Jane Davidson
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Jane Davidson

Jane Davidson

Jane started quilting over 20 years ago by designing and hand piecing a queen sized quilt. Caught up in study and travel, it was not until 2010 did she rekindle her passion for quilting again.
“I love everything about quilting and the quilting industry. I am so inspired by the enthusiasm and creativity I see everyday”.
A scientist at heart, Jane loves the engineering behind the quilt making process – the planning, the fabric selection, the designing and construction, and of course the quilting. She is always ready to challenge her skills when designing a new block or quilt.
These days you can find Jane in her studio running a professional long-arm quilting service, teaching, designing and planning her next publication.
Jane Davidson

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