Bake Shop Basics: Piecing Batting

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Another post in celebration of National Sewing Month! 
I LOVE using my fabric scraps… It’s my favorite fabric to sew with… And I equally LOVE using up my batting scraps as well.  You know that feeling when you gather up all the left overs and little bits and pieces in the fridge and make a really good dinner?  Yeah…. such a great feeling!  Which is the same feeling I get when I use up my batting left overs! 

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I’m going to show you the method I use when piecing larger batting leftovers. There are many ways to piece batting, and perhaps you’ll want to experiment a little to decide which method you prefer… 

I take two pieces of batting over to my ironing board, put a piece of fabric on top of them and give em a good press to get all the wrinkles and folds out… Then over to the cutting mat, where I trim them up to the same size… {you don’t have to do this, it’s just the way I like to} 

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Overlap the two pieces about 2-3 inches
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Using your rotary cutter, cut a nice wavy line from bottom to top making sure you’re catching both pieces of batting… Discard the little strips left over from the cut… 

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Look at that smooth crisp wavy line… exactly what we want… 
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There are a few different ways to “fuse” the two pieces together:
  
1… Lightweight fusible Interfacing
2… Fusible Batting Tape
3… Either Hand or Machine Basting with a large zig zag or cross stitch  
I prefer to use up my scraps of fusible interfacing.  I think it works perfectly!

Lay the two pieces of batting on top of your ironing board, matching up the curved cut… The pieces should butt up together, but not overlap.

Then follow these steps: 
1.  Cut a strip of fusible interfacing that will cover the entire curved cut
2.  Place sticky side down onto the batting
3.  Place a piece of fabric over the top and press with a hot iron. 

And that’s it!  Your batting is fused together and all ready to go!   I personally think the curved cut is less likely to show up on the finished quilt, than a straight one.

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And what do I do with my smaller batting left overs?  

I pre-cut them into a couple different sizes… This size {6″x 9″} is perfect for Mug Rugs… 
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I made this set of mug rugs using the quilt as you go technique. 

And this size {5″x5″} is perfect for coasters! 
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These pre-cut pieces make great foundations for Quilt As You Go projects! Oh so fun! 
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With these little tips you’ll be using your batting leftovers in no time!  And I’m sure you’ll come up with some great projects to use them with too!  I also have a list of 15 different uses for batting leftovers on my Blog...  You might be surprised at some of them…. 

Happy Sewing !!! ooxx

jodi from Pleasant Home

Jodi Nelson
Jodi Nelson

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