Moda Bake Shop Basics: Machine Applique





Machine Applique is probably the most favorite thing I love about sewing. If there is a way to put an applique on something, you can almost guarantee that I will put it on there.


There are two types of applique that can be done by machine... applique and reverse applique. 

1. An applique is when a piece of fabric is cut into a shape then stitched on top of a base fabric.


2. Reverse applique is when the shape is cut from the base fabric and another piece of fabric is attached underneath the base fabric so that fabric shows through the cut shape. You then stitch towards the top base fabric to secure in place.





Stitch Types... it's a personal thing. Use what you like best. 
Every sewing machine should have some basic stitches which are great to use with machine applique. Some machines have even more options from heirloom to decorative style stitches. Any stitch will work as long as you stitch along the edge of your applique fabric. Always use a test piece of fabric before sewing with new stitches to be sure you know where you needle is going and where to line up your fabrics with your machine foot.

Basic Applique Stitches... (A) Straight, (B) Zig-Zag, (C) Satin, (D) Blanket


Decorative Stitches... (E-F) Each model of machine has its own unique decorative stitches. I typically look for a stitch that has a straight edge in the stitching that I can line up with the raw edge of my applique to use as a guide when stitching.



 Just remember these three rules when machine appliqueing...

1. Use a high quality thread to help keep your stitches in tact for years to come. I like to use Aurifil Thread 50 wt and 40 wt in my sewing machine because of the quality and strength.

2. Use a fusible webbing to adhere your applique to your base fabric. Pellon makes two fantastic fusible webbing's... Wonder-Under and Heavy Duty Wonder-Under. I use the regular wonder-under when working with a single piece of fabric. The Heavy Duty Wonder-Under is great for a scrap applique when there are seams in the applique that the webbing needs to adhere to.

3. Have fun and experiment with new stitches.  I personally believe there is no wrong way to stitch on an applique. Be creative and try something new.


Get inspired and create something!

Angela Yosten
blog.angelayosten.com

Moda Fabrics featured... Flats by Angela Yosten and Bella Solid White.
Aurifil Threads featured... Flats by Angela Yosten in 50 wt
Stitches featured are from a Janome Horizon Memory Craft 8900 QCP sewing machine.

16 comments:

jabbott said...

The washing line stitch is so precious, thanks for sharing your tips was helpful

jabbott said...
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Rachel said...

How lovely! Your tips were so helpful...I haven't done too much applique yet (I've been a bit afraid to try it out much/uninspired by the few designs I've seen...I'm still a newbie quilter), but these should definitely help me!

Peggy Looby said...

I love the look of applique. Though I have some sewing and quilting experience, I find these tips from aid "sewists" the most helpful> Thanks, I feel like I will never learn all the rules!

Diane Calvi said...

As I start to applique I read your blog which was very helpful to me. Now I can use different stitches on my applique and I know it will look beautiful. Thanks for the info.

queenopearls said...

I do love your tips! Now tell me what machine has that clothes line stitch! :-D Not that I NEED another machine... but it is an adorable stitch. I also like the idea of using decorative stitches to attach applique. Do you remove the extra fabric behind the applique or just leave it in place?

Tabatha Alward said...

Thanks for sharing your tips was helpful. I can use different stitches on my applique and I know it will look beautiful. The next time can you give us some tips of using pressure cooker

Angela Yosten said...

@queenopearls... the machine I use that has the cute clothes line stitch is Janome Horizon Memory Craft 8900 QCP. I leave the extra fabric in place. If I am doing a reverse applique, then I will cut the bottom fabric the same size as the top fabric. For example... in the sample I made for this post, the bottom fabric and the top fabric are both 8 1/2" square. I then ironed the fusible web on the wrong side of the top fabric; cut out my shape from the top fabric; removed the paper backing; then ironed on the top cutout fabric to the right side of the bottom fabric. The bottom fabric now shows through the cutout shape and then you stitch around the shapes towards the top fabric.

Grandmasewnsew said...
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Grandmasewnsew said...

Thank you for making this so clear. I too would like to know which machine made the clothesline stitch. I checked your website and it says you use the 6500 but I don't find that as one of its decorative stitches. Please let us know :)

Gina E. said...

Thank you so much for this tutorial. I've always had to applique by hand (blanket stitch) until this year when I bought a Janome that has blanket stitch on it. I used it for the first time a few months ago and was so pleased - no more aching fingers!
I made one example of reverse applique for myself ages ago, and had forgotten how to do it, so your tutorial has been a great help :-)

CruiseFan said...

To be honest- I never liked applique!
Thanks to your tutorial I am thinking about thinking it over....
;-))

The Melt Lady said...

What shade is that red? It looks delicious.....

Jenn Liden said...

@tabatha, you can find tips here. Enjoy!

Malen said...

I sew a lot and I have always been wanting to make my own applique. I have a serger and I am yet to discover the decorative stitches I can do with it.

Isabella Bralet said...

I've used a Brother 1034D serger and I really have not explored it all, now I can use it to sew decorate with it. thank you for sharing and I love it.