Midwinter Cozy Quilt


Red is the color of toy wagons and rubber balls.  It is the color of roses and fire trucks.  These things are always red in my mind.  Even so, there is room in my mind for wagons, rubber balls, roses, and fire trucks of other colors.  However, when winter rolls around and the days get long and dark I always reach for my red sweater.  Midwinter Reds by Minick and Simpson packs all of the warmth and spirit of my favorite red sweater into a fabric line.  It fills my heart with memories of cold days and warm ginger bread, with visions of hearth and home.  It is a natural for this tiny quilt/toy/table topper.  I hope you home is filled with all of the warmth and joy that midwinter red has to offer.

Midwinter Cozy

  • Stars and Backgrounds
    • 8, 2 1/2″ Candy Charm Packs + 1, 5″ Charm Pack for a very scrappy look
    • OR 1 layer cake
  • Inner Border & Binding
    • 1/2 yard (I used tone on tone paisley in red SKU#14766-13)
  • Outer Border
    • 1/2 yard (I used red floral on tan, SKU #14761-16)
  • Backing
    • 1 yard (I used red dots on tan, SKU14767-16)

Cutting Directions:
  • Stars – If you are using a layer cake rather than the charm packs you can cut all of the required pieces from 1, 10″ x 10″ square.
    • cut 12 sets of
      • 8, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares (if not taken one each from the candy charm packs) for points.
      • 1, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ square (from matching 5″ charm) for centers.
  • Backgrounds – using either 3, 5″ charms or 1 layer cake square
    • cut 12 sets of
      • 4, 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ rectangles for edges.
      • 4, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares for corners.
  • Borders
    • Inner
      • cut 4, 1″ x width of fabric (wof) strips
    • Outer
      • cut 4, 3″ x wof strips
  • Binding
    • cut 4, 2 1/2″ x wof strips

Sewing Directions:
The directions are written as if you were making one block at a time.  When I want my projects to be more unified (less scrappy) I make them this way.  It is easier to keep all of the same colors together.  If you want a more scrappy project make all of the flying goose units at the same time, randomly selecting squares and rectangles.
  • Flying Goose Units
    • Gather
      • 8, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares
      • 4, 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ rectangles
    • Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of each 2 1/2″ square
    • With right sides together align one square atop one rectangle.
    • Sew along the line but just to the outside. (on the side toward the smallest part of the rectangle
    • Iron flap open – pushing the triangle lying over the larger part of the rectangle up and over the seam.
    • At this point you can trim the excess fabric from the back of the patch; however, I leave mine in.  It gives me a little more control over the bias edge that tend to make triangles warp, and it make the points stick out just a little more in the finished product.
    • You now have a rectangle with one corner different.
    • Repeat the process on the opposite side of triangle.
    • Be careful to get the seam going in the right direction.  It should be perpendicular to the seam you already made.
    • Trim unit back to 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ rectangle
    • Again, you choose to trim the seam allowances or not.
    • Repeat 3 times for a total of 4 units.
  • Block
    • Gather
      • 4 flying goose units
      • 4, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ background squares
      • 1, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ star square
    • Sew Rows
      • Top and bottom
        • Sew patches together as shown
        • Iron seam allowances towards the background squares
      • Center
        • Sew patches together as shown


        • Iron seam allowances towards the center
    • Sew rows together to form square.
    • Iron seam allowances away from the center block.  This will require a good deal of steam if you left the extra fabric on the goose patches.
    • Trim final block to 8 1/2″ x 8 1/2″
  • Make 12 blocks
  • The Quilt
    • Gather
      • 12, 8 1/2″ x 8 1/2″ star blocks
      • inner border – 4, 1″ x wof
      • outer border – 4, 3″ x wof
    • Arrange blocks in a 4 x 3 grid to your liking.
    • Sew 3 sets of 4 blocks together to make rows
    • Sew rows together to make center of top.
    • Sew inner border strips on long edges.
    • Iron seam allowances towards the border
    • Sew inner border strips on short edges
    • Irons seam allowances towards the border
    • Repeat border process with outer border.
    • Layer and quilt as desired.


One super cute little quilt for doll or baby.  This quilt is also sized nicely to fit on a coffee or end table.  Alter the arrangement of blocks to a 2 x 6 grid and create a sweet holiday runner.

 Food for thought -  This block was designed to be used with candy charm sized pieces.  You used them to make the points of the stars in the flying goose units, and the corner background pieces.  You could also use them to make the rest of the block.
Sew 2 candy charms together to make 1, 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ rectangle.  This is the size of the foundation rectangle for the flying goose unit.
Sew 4 candy charms together to make 1, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ square.  Perfect for the center of these stars!
Check out the block I made with 24 candy charm squares and the scraps from my inner border.  To do the same you need 12 light squares and 12 dark squares.  Depending on the fabric line (not all lines have the same number of dark and light fabrics in them) you could make 2 blocks per candy charm pack.  OR, go with a regular sized charm pack and you have the makings of 8 blocks.  OR go with a layer cake and you can make 32 blocks.  I think I would love to see that quilt!
This is a picture collage made on PicMonkey.
  Imagine how cool it would look with 16 different blocks!
No matter what version of this pattern you use, or what fabric line, I ‘d love to see it.  Please add a picture to the Tops to Treasures Flickr group, or send me your photo.  I would be glad to add it for you.

Cindy Sharp
{www.topstotreasures.blogspot.com}

Cindy Sharp

Longarm Quilter at Tops to Treasures
My brief bio -A transplanted Yankee, and happy Texan Cindy works from her home in North Texas where she lives with her family.She started piecing quilts over 20 years ago and opened her long arm business, Tops to Treasures, in 2006.Since then she has quilted over 1,000 quilts.As a pattern designer, Cindy's goal is to write directions that encourage quilters to grow in their skills, and have fun. Her patterns are based on traditional designs, often with a modern twist.

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