Jelly Roll Race Remix Quilt


Hello, Karin Vail from Cascade Quilts back again this month with yet another Christmas in July project!

2 Jelly Rolls (or 2 jelly roll race quilt tops – or a combo of the two!)  I used 24th and Pine by Basic Grey
2/3 yard for binding (or use leftovers for a scrappy binding)
1 yard inner border (cut into 8@ 4.5”WOF strips)
1 1/2  yards outer border (cut into 8@ 6.5”WOF strips)
5 yards backing

Probably most quilters have tried this at one point or another –  a ”Jelly Roll Race” (JRR) quilt top.  It works up fast for sure – but makes a rather ho-hum quilt.  I made one myself years ago, but it was not ever destined to be made into a quilt after I finished the top and didn’t love it.
So, WHAT do you do with a JRR quilt top that you love the fabric, but don’t love the design?  Rework it by adding yet another JRR top to the mix…..
Now, there are lots of JRR quilt tutorials out there, so I am not going to go into how to make those.  What I am going to explain is how I remade these two JRR tops into a beautiful quilt with MUCH more visual interest!  These JRR tops will each measure around 50”x64” to begin with.

Yes, I made TWO identical JRR tops, but you could certainly make two different tops and use this same technique.  It is similar to a ‘bargello’ technique.  If you did this, I would alternated between strips from the two JRR tops to get a uniform look throughout.
First, take one JRR top and fold it in half so that the top strip can be sewn to the bottom strip – so you make a JRR ‘tube’.  Think of it like a *giant* trip-around-the-world block setup.  From that tube, you will cut cross-section strips.   Here the seam has been sewn to make the tube and it’s again folded in half horizontally so I can do the subcutting.
In this quilt, I cut my strips 2.5” so that I have 2” squares in my final quilt, but you can certainly change it up and cut varying widths of strips!
For the first strip, take apart one seam between blocks.
The next strip, you will take apart the next seam up from the one you took apart on the first strip, and so on.
To make it easier to keep track and keep them in the right orientation (how they came off of the original JRR top), I cut only a few strip tubes at a time and sewed them a few at a time.
Match up your seams and sew the long verticle seams.
Where the fabrics change, you will get several almost-half square triangles.  Or, you might luck out and get a perfect HST in the mix too:
You should be able to get twenty 2.5” strips from each JRR ‘tube’, so with two ‘tubes’ you would be able to get a total width of 80” if you used it all.  But, since the length of the quilt is only 64” at this point, and I didn’t want an 80×64 quilt,  I decided to stop at 64” wide and add borders to enlarge it and have a balanced quilt.  I personally prefer a square quilt since you don’t have to worry which side is ‘up’ that way 🙂  If you are using 2 identical tops, cut 20 strips from one top, and 12 from the second.  If you are using 2 different JRR tops, then cut 16 strips from each JRR ‘tube’.
Now, take your 8@ 4.5”WOF strips and sew them into pairs to create 4 longer strips.  Measure your quilt top, cut border fabric to match, and sew the border on top and bottom.  Mine measured 64.5”.  Press, measure the length you will now need for the sides and cut your remaining border strips to length, and sew on left and right sides.  Mine measured 72.5”.
For your second border, take your 8@ 6.5” strips and sew them into pairs.  Again, measure your quilt top as per the first border.  My first measurement for the top/bottom was 72.5” and second for the sides was 84.5”.


A generous 84”x84” quilt!

Karin Vail
{Cascade Quilts}

Karin Vail

Karin Vail

I have been quilting since 1989 but the last few years it has become an obsession.I blog at Cascade Quilts and Moda pre-cuts are my favorite fabrics to use for quilting.I love modern fabrics, but lean toward more traditional patterns for the most part.I live in NW Washington state and have two grown sons.I have been married to my best friend since 1991.I work from home sewing custom hats, but when business is slow, I quilt!
Karin Vail

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