Christmas Candy Mini Quilt

Merry Christmas, quilting friends!

I know July may be a bit too early for season’s greetings, but it’s definitely not too early to begin your Christmas stitching!  And in the spirit of the season, here’s a fast and fun mini charm pack pattern that’s perfect for holiday decorating or gifting.  I made my version of Christmas Candy with “Petites Maisons de Noël” by French General for Moda and the colors and prints couldn’t be prettier!

This quilt finishes at 14″ x 14″.  Be sure to check out my blog JenDalyQuilts.com to find a Halloween version of this quilt finished as a pillow.

Now let’s get started!

8cb62-title_ingredients

1 Moda Candy (shown in Petites Maisons de Noël by French General for Moda)
1/8 yard (or one Fat Sixteenth) background fabric (shown in French General Favorites Pearl Linen)
1/2 yards backing fabric (shown in Petites Maisons de Noël Rouge Celeste)
1/4 yards binding fabric (shown in Petites Maisons de Noël Rouge Clara)
batting measuring 18″ x 18″
embroidery floss (shown in Valdani Three-Strand Floss:  775 – Turkey Red, 575 – Crisp Leaf, 154 – Deep Antique Gold)

96b91-title_instructions

Cutting:

From your background fabric, cut:

  • 2 strips 1 1/2″ x 8 1/2″ (inner border)
  • 2 strips 1 1/2″ x 10 1/2″ (inner border)

From your backing fabric, cut:

  • 1 panel 18″ x 18″

From your binding fabric, cut:

  • 2 strips 2 1/4″ x WOF (width of fabric)

Before you begin, take a few minutes to sort your mini charm squares.  You’ll need 16 for the center of the quilt and 24 for the pieced border.

Here are the charm squares I chose for the center of my little quilt:

And the squares I chose for the pieced border:

Assembling the Quilt Top:
1. Lay out the 16 mini charm squares that you chose for your quilt center in 4 rows of 4 squares each.

2. Sew the squares in each row together.  Press seam allowances in one direction, alternating direction in each row.

3. Sew the rows together.  Press seam allowances open.  At this point, your quilt center should measure 8 1/2″ x 8 1/2″.

4. Sew a background fabric 1 1/2″ x 8 1/2″ strip to the left and right sides of the quilt center.  Press the seam allowances toward the center of the quilt.

5. Sew a background fabric 1 1/2″ x 10 1/2″ strip to the top and bottom of the quilt center.  Press the seam allowances toward the center of the quilt.

6. Using the 24 mini charm squares that you reserved for the pieced border, lay out 2 borders of 7 squares each and 2 borders of 5 squares each.

7. Sew the squares in each border together.  Press seam allowances in one direction.

8. Sew a short pieced border to the left and right side of the quilt center.  Press seam allowances toward the pieced border.

9. Sew a long pieced border to the top and bottom of the quilt center.  Press seam allowances toward the pieced border.

Embroidering the Quilt Top:

  1. Mark the embroidery pattern on the inner border of the quilt top as shown using a water-soluble marking pen.  You can find the pattern for the embroidery here.

2. Layer the marked quilt top with batting ONLY and baste.  Because this is a small piece, I used spray basting adhesive to baste my quilt.

3. Use two strands of red floss and a backstitch to stitch the poinsettias through both layers.

4. Use two strands of green floss and a backstitch to stitch the vines and leaves.

5. Use two strands of gold floss to stitch three French Knots in the center of each poinsettia.

6. Use two strands of red floss to stitch French Knot “berries” as marked on the embroidery pattern.

Finishing the Quilt:

After you’ve finished embroidering your quilt top, carefully wash out the marking.  Once you are sure that all of your marking is removed, gently press your embroidered quilt top/batting.  Layer the embroidered quilt top/batting with backing fabric and baste—once again, I used spray basting adhesive.  Quilt as desired.  I machine quilted my little quilt by stitching in the ditch in the patchwork center and along both sides of the embroidered inner border.  Then trim your quilt through all layers and bind.

4b2da-title_yield

One charming 14″ square mini quilt!

Thank you so much for following along!  And don’t forget to check out my blog to see my Halloween Candy pillow made with “Hocus Pocus” fabric by Sandy Gervais.  I’ll also be posting photos of the pillow alternative on Facebook and Instagram @jendalyquilts.

Happy Quilting!

Jen Daly

{jendalyquilts.com}

Jen Daly

Jen Daly

Hi! My name is Jen Daly and I'm a pattern designer, blogger, and fabric lover! My patterns have been featured in Quilters Newsletter, Primitive Quilts and Projects, McCall's Quick Quilts, and American Patchwork & Quilting's Calendars.You can find out more about me and my designs at my blog, jendalyquilts.com, or on Facebook and Instagram @jendalyquilts.
Jen Daly

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25 comments on “Christmas Candy Mini Quilt

  1. Betty says:

    A quilt that uses mini charm squares is a treat, but your quilt goes way beyond that. I love it and with my intent to start my Christmas projects early this will be a must make. Seeing the name Jen Daly made me know I was in for something special. The size is perfect. Thank you so very much for a super cute pattern.

    • Jen Daly Jen Daly says:

      Thank you so much for your comment, Betty — you made my day!! I’d love to see a picture of your quilt when you finish it!

  2. Carol Hartman says:

    Love this mini quilt. Want to make a table topper. This pattern is idea.. Thank you

  3. cathy L says:

    Your square mini quilt is sew cute!!! Love it!

  4. ANN M. says:

    This is perfect for the holidays. Thank-you.

  5. I love your little mini quilt and the hand embroidery takes it over the top for me. I always love the special touch of hand embroidery for small projects, just makes them that much more special.

  6. Linda Hammer says:

    I love this pattern. I decided just recently that I love the small pieces of quilting. They take less time and I have many more uses for them. Thank you so much for sharing this pattern. I’m buying the fabrics today!!!!

    • Jen Daly Jen Daly says:

      I’m so happy that you like this project, Linda, and I love small projects too! I’d love to see your quilt when it’s finished!

  7. Jolie composition ! Bravo!

  8. Hedy Hahn says:

    I love your added embroidery work, it makes the quilt.

  9. Margie says:

    Thank you! Two really cute quilts! Margie/NY

  10. MissMollie says:

    Just the perfect size & just the right fabric for keepsake gifts. Thanks for sharing such a beautiful idea, and so do-able! Love, love, love it!

  11. Jen Daly Jen Daly says:

    I’m so glad you like it, Miss Mollie!

  12. Susan Suchower says:

    I went to your blog I really like the pillow idea and the idea of using your mini- quilt as a candle mat. Thank you for the fun projects….

  13. Ann says:

    Love this! I bookmarked it and finally got around to working on the project and now have the top ready for the handwork. I do have a question, though. Why do you do the embroidery with the batting on? Is it better to do it through the batting instead of just through the top? And does it matter what type of batting you use? (OK, that was three questions. Sorry!)

    • Jen Daly Jen Daly says:

      Hi Ann – Thanks for your questions! I like to do the embroidery with the batting on for a few reasons: 1. because it prevents the ends of the floss from showing through on the top of the quilt, 2. because it adds a bit of dimension to the stitching (kind of like quilting) and 3. because it helps keep the fabric from stretching or distorting while it is in the hoop. In terms of what type of batting to use, I like Warm & White or Warm & Natural batting. It’s all cotton and low loft and I can buy it using a coupon (wink wink). I’d hesitate to use this method with a batting with a lot of polyester in it in case the fibers pulled through to the front of the quilt top when you were stitching and I definitely wouldn’t do it with a medium or high loft batting. If you’re uncertain about using batting for this step, you can also back your quilt top with a lightweight interfacing. It won’t give your stitching dimension, but it will help mask floss ends and give extra stability to your top. Have fun!

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