Sew to Celebrate

September is officially known as National Sewing Month and what better way to celebrate than to spend a day (or more!) sewing. Last year our Chefs whipped up a batch of Moda Bake Shop Basics – tutorials to help with some basic sewing and quilting techniques. Find links to some of the most popular ones below.

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1. Sewing with Jelly Rolls, 2. Perfect Quilt Borders, 3. Matching Points

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4. Machine Applique, 5. Piecing Batting, 6. Rotary Safety, 7. Perfect Pressing, 8. Binding a Quilt

How are you celebrating National Sewing Month?

Bake Shop Basics: Piecing Batting

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Another post in celebration of National Sewing Month! 
I LOVE using my fabric scraps… It’s my favorite fabric to sew with… And I equally LOVE using up my batting scraps as well.  You know that feeling when you gather up all the left overs and little bits and pieces in the fridge and make a really good dinner?  Yeah…. such a great feeling!  Which is the same feeling I get when I use up my batting left overs! 
 
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I’m going to show you the method I use when piecing larger batting leftovers. There are many ways to piece batting, and perhaps you’ll want to experiment a little to decide which method you prefer… 
 
I take two pieces of batting over to my ironing board, put a piece of fabric on top of them and give em a good press to get all the wrinkles and folds out… Then over to the cutting mat, where I trim them up to the same size… {you don’t have to do this, it’s just the way I like to} 

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Overlap the two pieces about 2-3 inches
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Using your rotary cutter, cut a nice wavy line from bottom to top making sure you’re catching both pieces of batting… Discard the little strips left over from the cut… 
 
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Look at that smooth crisp wavy line… exactly what we want… 
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There are a few different ways to “fuse” the two pieces together:
  
1… Lightweight fusible Interfacing
2… Fusible Batting Tape
3… Either Hand or Machine Basting with a large zig zag or cross stitch  
I prefer to use up my scraps of fusible interfacing.  I think it works perfectly!
 
Lay the two pieces of batting on top of your ironing board, matching up the curved cut… The pieces should butt up together, but not overlap.
 
Then follow these steps: 
1.  Cut a strip of fusible interfacing that will cover the entire curved cut
2.  Place sticky side down onto the batting
3.  Place a piece of fabric over the top and press with a hot iron. 
 
And that’s it!  Your batting is fused together and all ready to go!   I personally think the curved cut is less likely to show up on the finished quilt, than a straight one.
 
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And what do I do with my smaller batting left overs?  
 
I pre-cut them into a couple different sizes… This size {6″x 9″} is perfect for Mug Rugs… 
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I made this set of mug rugs using the quilt as you go technique. 
 
And this size {5″x5″} is perfect for coasters! 
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These pre-cut pieces make great foundations for Quilt As You Go projects! Oh so fun! 
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With these little tips you’ll be using your batting leftovers in no time!  And I’m sure you’ll come up with some great projects to use them with too!  I also have a list of 15 different uses for batting leftovers on my Blog...  You might be surprised at some of them…. 
 
Happy Sewing !!! ooxxjodi from Pleasant Home

Bake Shop Basics: Quilt Borders

Today our Bake Shop Basics series continues with Chef Anjeanette sharing the proper way to make and attach quilt borders.

Hi Moda Bake Shop! It is Anjeanette from by Anjeanette. I’m going to share one of my favorite parts of making a quilt today.

Do you ever finish your quilt and wonder why your sides are wavy and won’t lay flat? You may not have put your borders on correctly.

Once your quilt top is all pieced and you are ready to add borders, it is tempting to just slap a long length of fabric on the sides, cut off any excess and think you are good to go. You have spent a good amount of time making your quilt top, it is a good idea to take this extra step to finish it correctly. Who wants a wavy quilt?
When you are ready to add your borders, lay the quilt on a flat surface. Measure through the center, from the top to the bottom. Cut two side borders to this measurement length.

Taking one border strip at a time, fold lengthwise in half and then again into fourths. Place a pin at the fold points. You will end up with three pins in the border. Fold your quilt in half and then fourths, and pin the fold points. With right sides together, pin the ends of the border to the ends of the quilt. Match the center pins from the border and quilt and pin together. Match the quarter marks from the border and quilt and pin together. I then fill in between the pins with at least one more pin for each fourth. 

There often is a little bit of excess fullness or fabric on either the border side or the quilt top. Whichever side seems more full, place towards the feed dogs when sewing. The feed dogs will help ease any fullness out.

You may need to gently hold the fabric taught in front of the presser foot as you sew to help ease any fullness out.

If it seems like there isn’t any fullness or excess fabric on either the border, or the quilt top, place the quilt top towards the feed dogs when sewing.

After both side borders are sewn on, press the seam allowance away from the quilt top, or towards the border.
Now repeat the whole process for the top and bottom borders.
Lay the quilt on a flat surface. Measure through the center of the quilt, from one side to the other side. Cut two borders to this measurement. Pin the quarter marks on the borders and quilt. Pin the borders to the quilt matching pins. Pin the ends of the border and the quilt together. Etc.
A few tips:
  • Using a walking foot for these long seams is helpful.
  • It is okay if you have to piece or sew two strips together to make the total length measurement.  Just make sure you are cutting your border to the correct measurement before sewing on.


A perfectly flat quilt with borders.

Moda Bake Shop Basics: Machine Applique

Machine Applique is probably the most favorite thing I love about sewing. If there is a way to put an applique on something, you can almost guarantee that I will put it on there.

There are two types of applique that can be done by machine… applique and reverse applique. 

1. An applique is when a piece of fabric is cut into a shape then stitched on top of a base fabric.

2. Reverse applique is when the shape is cut from the base fabric and another piece of fabric is attached underneath the base fabric so that fabric shows through the cut shape. You then stitch towards the top base fabric to secure in place.

Stitch Types… it’s a personal thing. Use what you like best. 
Every sewing machine should have some basic stitches which are great to use with machine applique. Some machines have even more options from heirloom to decorative style stitches. Any stitch will work as long as you stitch along the edge of your applique fabric. Always use a test piece of fabric before sewing with new stitches to be sure you know where you needle is going and where to line up your fabrics with your machine foot.

Basic Applique Stitches… (A) Straight, (B) Zig-Zag, (C) Satin, (D) Blanket

Decorative Stitches… (E-F) Each model of machine has its own unique decorative stitches. I typically look for a stitch that has a straight edge in the stitching that I can line up with the raw edge of my applique to use as a guide when stitching.

 Just remember these three rules when machine appliqueing…

1. Use a high quality thread to help keep your stitches in tact for years to come. I like to use Aurifil Thread 50 wt and 40 wt in my sewing machine because of the quality and strength.

2. Use a fusible webbing to adhere your applique to your base fabric. Pellon makes two fantastic fusible webbing’s… Wonder-Under and Heavy Duty Wonder-Under. I use the regular wonder-under when working with a single piece of fabric. The Heavy Duty Wonder-Under is great for a scrap applique when there are seams in the applique that the webbing needs to adhere to.

3. Have fun and experiment with new stitches.  I personally believe there is no wrong way to stitch on an applique. Be creative and try something new.

Get inspired and create something!

Angela Yosten
blog.angelayosten.com

Moda Fabrics featured… Flats by Angela Yosten and Bella Solid White.
Aurifil Threads featured… Flats by Angela Yosten in 50 wt
Stitches featured are from a Janome Horizon Memory Craft 8900 QCP sewing machine.